« Bad Behavior Solved, Not Made, in High-Quality Pre-K | Main | A Window on Bilingual Pre-K »

April 06, 2007

The Benefits of Pre-K: A Parent's Perspective

After reading the reports about the link between childcare and negative behavior problems later on, I thought it might be helpful to hear a parent’s take on the effect of pre-k on her son’s development.  I decided to interview Ravon’s mother (“RM” for the remainder of the interview).

Ms. Pappas: Why did you decide to enroll Ravon in pre-k?

RM: I didn’t want a lot of play for Ravon.  My younger brother was in your class the previous year, and I always liked the way you involved the parents in the homework assignments.  I like the interaction with me and Ravon because I know what he is learning and we can work on further developing his listening and language skills together.  Also, you still let them play in your classroom, but they learn through the play.  Daycare was just play, play, color, color, all day long, but not enough learning. 

Ms. Pappas:  What do you think about recent studies that link childcare programs with negative behavior later on?

RM: Well, I used to work in daycare, so I agree.  They tend to baby the kids instead of giving them ways to solve problems when they misbehave.  They don’t explain things as much.  The regular elementary school pre-k is different.  You explain to the child why they are wrong and how they can correct themselves. 

Ms. Pappas: How much education do you think a pre-k teacher needs in order to benefit children?

RM: I think experience goes a long way, often more than education.  Some people with experience over education can deal with children better.  My grandmother had no education and kept eight children in line. 

Ms. Pappas: What are the benefits of pre-k?

RM: I have seen so much growth with Ravon.  He’s expressing himself better.  He’s more disciplined, and he wants to come to school.  He doesn’t want to miss a day.  My husband and I are so happy. 

Ms. Pappas: What are your hopes for Ravon?

RM: Ravon can write, express himself more, interpret things better, read at least on his level. 

Ms. Pappas: What about in the long run?

RM: I want my son to go to college.  I want him to have a very decent job.  I want him to enjoy what he does.  It's not as much about the money.  I really want him to be happy. 

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83453044569e200e54f9138678833

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The Benefits of Pre-K: A Parent's Perspective:

Comments

I teach Pre-K in the same school as Sophia and share her concern for providing quality child care. I have worked in early childhood for a number of years and have seen the positive results from a quality program. I have also seen the results of programs that are not based onlong term planning and knowledge of childhood development. The difference is often the training and education of the teachers. Knowing the long ternm results of the actions taken in the classroom.

Thanks, Kathleen. I think it's important to distinguish between the types of programs and their effects on children when analyzing the benefits and shortcomings of early childhood programs.

Sophia

Hi Sophia Great Post! I just wanted you to know that my 4 year old is now able to read HOP on POP it is amazing... i am a former teacher but your tips were THE BEST thank you so much, hopefully he will be reading longer by the summer I will keep you updated!!

Hi Sophia Great Post! I just wanted you to know that my 4 year old is now able to read HOP on POP it is amazing... i am a former teacher but your tips were THE BEST thank you so much, hopefully he will be reading longer by the summer I will keep you updated!!

Wow! That is so great. I am glad the tips were helpful and your 4 year old has shown so much progress.

Let me know if you have any additional questions.

I am on spring break right now, but will be back to posting pieces and teaching next week.

Regards,
Sophia

greeting sophia - love your blog site - i'm just scratching the surface here and really enjoy what i've read so far...found you by googling "4yr old pre-k". anyway, my son turned 4 on august 9 and started pre-k on august 20 in south florida. today was the second day and he had some issues with going back - he used "having to go to the bathroom" as a reason for not wanting to get dropped off this morning. Mother and son returned home and father (myself) and son returned to school an hour late. I explained to him that school was going to be a part of his life for a long time and that I trusted this school and that i would be there for him no matter what. He walked right in and sat down at the table without word. I gave him a quick thumbs up from the door and left. Anyway, my concern is that we already have a problem with him not wanting to go after the 1st day of a lengthy time to be spent there. I want to make sure he feels safe there, that he wants to go because he's having fun and learning, and that he realizes the importance of school. Is this realistic with a 3/4yr old?

greeting sophia - love your blog site - i'm just scratching the surface here and really enjoy what i've read so far...found you by googling "4yr old pre-k". anyway, my son turned 4 on august 9 and started pre-k on august 20 in south florida. today was the second day and he had some issues with going back - he used "having to go to the bathroom" as a reason for not wanting to get dropped off this morning. Mother and son returned home and father (myself) and son returned to school an hour late. I explained to him that school was going to be a part of his life for a long time and that I trusted this school and that i would be there for him no matter what. He walked right in and sat down at the table without word. I gave him a quick thumbs up from the door and left. Anyway, my concern is that we already have a problem with him not wanting to go after the 1st day of a lengthy time to be spent there. I want to make sure he feels safe there, that he wants to go because he's having fun and learning, and that he realizes the importance of school. Is this realistic with a 3/4yr old?

Brett,

Thanks for the email. In terms of what is expected at 3 or 4, all kids have different experiences transitioning from home to school and therefore need different things. Some kids walk right in and are fine, others need a longer adjustment period. When it is tougher, I think parents and teachers can do a lot to help smooth the transition. Have you had conversations with her son and his teacher about this? I would try to get a sense from him of what he likes and does not like about school. Likewise, I would talk to his teacher about what he is like throughout the day. Then, I would try to bridge home and school during this transition time. If your son really likes music at school, what are some ways you can extend that type of activity at home to let him see that home and school are not too completely separate worlds. Likewise, what does your son like to do at home? Is there a way of extending that in school? Do they have some kind of sharing or "show and tell" type of activity or is there a time of day during which your son can explore interests he normally explores at home (e.g., if your son likes to play with animal toys at home, how can he take advantage of the school's animal toy resources? How can your son discuss things he likes to do at home in school? Is there an open sharing time during the day?). Does your son like to write and draw? How does he express himself? I would try to get him to open up to you about what he likes and does not like so you can try to get to the bottom of his fears. If he is just scared that you will not come back or if he just misses you, how can you stay connected even when you are not there? Can you make a plan, for instance, for him to make you something (e.g., painting in Art or a letter in the Writing area) and for you to do the same (e.g., write him a note or draw him a picture on special stationary)?

Let me know if this helps and if you have additional questions.

All the best,

Sophia

Dear Ms. / Mrs.,
We are an international school planning to open in November '07 in Cairo, Egypt. We will start with the preschool years (2 - 4 years). We are seeking female teachers and supervisors who had experience with early childhood; experience with The Creative Curriculum will be an asset.

If interested or you can help us findsomeone who could be interested, please contact us on this e-mail: kunouzy@yahoo.com

Best regards,
Nehal Noaman

The comments to this entry are closed.

.

Inside Pre-K

.

Current Author

John
John
Send me e-mail
I teach pre-k at a Head Start in Virginia. more...

Past Authors

Jennifer
Vanessa
Karissa
Sophia "Good Morning Children"

Recent Comments

Pre-K Now News

Visit Pre-K Now
Pre-K Now is a public education and advocacy organization that advances high-quality, voluntary pre-kindergarten for all three and four year olds. Visit Pre-K Now >
.

Kids Quotes

Post a Kids Quote>>

Friends

BoardBuzz

Lead From The Start

Early Stories

Pre-K Vermont

The Early Ed Watch Blog

Urban Preschool

Links

Enchanted Learning

National Association for the Education of Young Children

Pre-K Now

Reading Is Fundamental

Scholastic

Teach for America

Teaching Our Youngest

The Perpetual Preschool

.
About Pre-K Now National Events Calendar 
© 2005-2008 Pre-K Now